Research + News | Topic: Books

Textbook Trends: How U.S. College Students Source Course Materials

More than two-thirds (69%) of total expenditure on course textbooks continues to go towards print materials, according to data from Nielsen’s U.S. Student Attitudes Towards Content in Higher Education report. Read the article here.

Forced Readings: A Twisted View of Censorship on Campus

This Salvo Magazine article takes a look at how liberal education is redefining censorship. Read the article here.

Duke University Freshmen Refuse To Read ‘Fun Home’ For Moral Reasons

Incoming freshmen at Duke University are reportedly refusing to read their summer novel, Fun Home – an LGBT graphic novel – due to their Christian and moral beliefs.

Read the article here.

What the College Kids Are Reading

Many colleges assign required reading for incoming freshman. What kinds of titles are on this year’s list?

Read the article here.

The Average College Freshman Reads at 7th Grade Level

Most college textbooks and reading material written before 1970 require mature reading skills. Read the article here.

A Jubilee Rumination from Byron Borger of Hearts & Minds

LforLoveofGodpicThe College Transition Initiatives’ good friend and favorite bookseller, Byron Borger, offers a very thoughtful reflection on the Jubilee Conference held in Pittsburgh, PA February 14-16. At the conclusion of his rumination, Byron highlights Learning for the Love of God, coauthored by CTI director Derek Melleby:

“There is no better book to get at this amazing aspect of responsible discipleship than the brand new Learning for the Love of God: A Students Guide to Academic Faithfulness by Dr. Donald Opitz and Derek Melleby. It is the newly revised and expanded edition of a Hearts & Minds favorite (previously known as The Outrageous Idea of Academic Faithfulness). This brand new edition, with its new chapters and updates and appendices, was celebrated and premiered at Jubilee, too, and we couldn’t have been more earnest when I said that it may have been one of the most important books for students in the entire (huge) book display…

May Learning for the Love of God be used to invite students to take their faith into the classrooms and labs and study halls, to make their own connections between their deepest religious beliefs and their studies, and find, early on, a sense of God’s call upon their lives, even as they grow in this exciting period of life for them lived out on campuses across this land.

May it also be used by pastors and youth workers and parents and older siblings to help young adults grapple with finding a relevant and coherent faith in their college years.  May it stimulate, perhaps even among older adults, a fresh realization of the breadth of the Kingdom of God, the obligation to think faithfully, and the vision of vocation that circles around so many of the best books we promote here at the shop.”

Read the full article here.