Research + News | Topic: Faith & Culture

Forced Readings: A Twisted View of Censorship on Campus

This Salvo Magazine article takes a look at how liberal education is redefining censorship. Read the article here.

Five Conversations You Must Have With Grads Before College

Graduation has come and gone, but your recent high school grads are likely still around for a little longer. What should your final conversations with them be about?

This blog post from Fuller Youth Institute helps address the topic. Read the post here.

Do College Students Care About Truth?

Because of the impact of post-modernism, many seem to assume that college students are not interested in objective truth. Is this true?

Read the article here.

Duke University Freshmen Refuse To Read ‘Fun Home’ For Moral Reasons

Incoming freshmen at Duke University are reportedly refusing to read their summer novel, Fun Home – an LGBT graphic novel – due to their Christian and moral beliefs.

Read the article here.

Academics and Faith: An Interview with Dr. Jay Green

Dr. Jay Green, a professor of history at Covenant College, wants Christians to rethink the way we approach academic studies. Read the interview here.

How Do We Love a Broken World?

“Knowing what we know about the world, with all its wonder and wounds, what will we do? Do we see ourselves implicated, for love’s sake, in the way the world turns out?” This is a question that all college students should be asking before arriving on campus, while they are engaged in their academic pursuits while on campus, and for their entire lifetime after graduation. It’s also the question that’s at the heart of Steve Garber’s book, Visions of Vocation. Garber encourages readers – young and old alike – to always be asking, “If we know the world the way God knows it and if we love the world the way God loves it, then what, when we confront the brokenness, will we do?” The answer, Garber says, is found in our individual callings. It’s there, he says, that we see the world as it is. And it’s there — with the duties and responsibilities we each have — that we’re able to proactively and redemptively love the people and places around us.

In a recent interview with ByFaith Magazine, Garber says,

“We are called to be salt and light. As John Stott taught us, salt and light are affective commodities; they affect their environments. So we are never to curse rooms that are dark; rather we are to ask, ‘Why wasn’t the light turned on?’ In a culture of whatever, which is oppressive in every way that matters, we are called to enter in — with faith, hope, and love — in and through our vocations, offering visions of what might be, of what could be, of what someday will be.”

Read the rest of the interview here.

3 Faith and Culture Trends for 2014

MajorTrendsBarna Group has identified three major trends concerning faith and culture. The research reports that “Americans are ranking their confidence in institutions at abysmal levels. And this institutional skepticism comprises a significant backdrop for the major faith and culture trends of 2014.”

Here are the three major trends:

1. The role of “church” generates both more skeptics and stronger apologists. 

2. Americans wrestle with a culture of violence.

3. Trust in the public school system is failing.

Read the full report here.