Research + News | Topic: Vocation

Why Go To College?

IIn partnership with the Association for Biblical Higher Education (ABHE), Barna asked American adults about their beliefs on the primary purpose of a college education. Read the results here.

This Is What American Teenagers Want To Be When They Grow Up

When it comes to careers, young people have stars in their eyes. Read the article here.

High Cost Of Education Limits Career Choices For Millennials

We’ve all seen the staggering student loan debt statistics: It averages more than $20,000 and 69% of Millennials have student loan debt, according to the Federal Reserve of New York. What the numbers don’t tell us is what is going on in Millennials’ minds before they take on this debt.

Read the rest of the article here.

When Millennials Go to Work

It’s graduation season, and that means millions of young Americans (Millennials) are being awarded degrees from colleges and universities across the nation, and are now heading into the workforce—many for the first time ever. But what are the unique expectations of this generation when it comes to work?

Read the research article from Barna here.

What Student-Athletes Should Know Before Entering College

Graduate student and college athlete Alicia Whittle writes a post for the Growing Leaders blog about what she wished she had known before heading off to college. Read the post here.

Academics and Faith: An Interview with Dr. Jay Green

Dr. Jay Green, a professor of history at Covenant College, wants Christians to rethink the way we approach academic studies. Read the interview here.

How Do We Love a Broken World?

“Knowing what we know about the world, with all its wonder and wounds, what will we do? Do we see ourselves implicated, for love’s sake, in the way the world turns out?” This is a question that all college students should be asking before arriving on campus, while they are engaged in their academic pursuits while on campus, and for their entire lifetime after graduation. It’s also the question that’s at the heart of Steve Garber’s book, Visions of Vocation. Garber encourages readers – young and old alike – to always be asking, “If we know the world the way God knows it and if we love the world the way God loves it, then what, when we confront the brokenness, will we do?” The answer, Garber says, is found in our individual callings. It’s there, he says, that we see the world as it is. And it’s there — with the duties and responsibilities we each have — that we’re able to proactively and redemptively love the people and places around us.

In a recent interview with ByFaith Magazine, Garber says,

“We are called to be salt and light. As John Stott taught us, salt and light are affective commodities; they affect their environments. So we are never to curse rooms that are dark; rather we are to ask, ‘Why wasn’t the light turned on?’ In a culture of whatever, which is oppressive in every way that matters, we are called to enter in — with faith, hope, and love — in and through our vocations, offering visions of what might be, of what could be, of what someday will be.”

Read the rest of the interview here.

The Real Reason College Grads Can’t Get Hired?

rear-view-of-students-wearing-graduation-capsTime Magazine reports on research suggesting that the main reason new college grads aren’t being hired is for lack of “soft skills.” From the article:

“It’s because college kids today can’t do math, one line of reasoning goes. Or they don’t know science. Or they’re clueless about technology, aside from their myriad social-media profiles. These are all good theories, but the problem with the unemployability of these young adults goes way beyond a lack of STEM skills. As it turns out, they can’t even show up on time in a button-down shirt and organize a team project.

The technical term for navigating a workplace effectively might be soft skills, but employers are facing some hard facts: the entry-level candidates who are on tap to join the ranks of full-time work are clueless about the fundamentals of office life.”

Read the full report here.

The Promise of Religious Colleges

InsideHigherEdGordon College professor, Thomas Albert Howard, has written an article for Inside High Ed about the “propitious opportunity” the present moment offers religious colleges and universities. For Dr. Howard, small, evangelical colleges are well-equipped to offer students an education focused on character formation and vocational discernment. He writes:

“Education about things that matter, Aristotle tells us in his Ethics, is often more about emulating a person than mastering a precept. Developing lasting mentors and true friends over the course of four years hardly figures in college rankings. But perhaps it is the factor that matters most.”

Read the full article here.

5 Reasons Millennials Stay Connected to Church

BarnaStudyBarna Group research, after a decade of interviews (27,140) and conducting over 200 studies, reveals reasons for why Millennials (generation born between 1894-2002) stay connected to churches.

From the report: “Barna Group’s research has previously highlighted what’s not working to keep Millennials at church, the research also illuminates what is working—and what churches can do to engage these young adults.” According to the research, churches that have had success keeping in attendance have 5 characteristics:

1. Make room for meaningful relationships.

2. Teach cultural discernment.

3. Make reverse mentoring a priority.

4. Embrace the potency of vocational discipleship.

5. Facilitate connection with Jesus.

Read the full report here.